Marcus Allen

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  • Sport: American Football
  • Born:March 26, 1960,
  • Residence:United States

Biography

Brilliant running back Marcus Allen is considered one of the greatest American Football players of all time. An outstanding goal line and short-yardage runner, he was the first player to gain more than 10,000 rushing yards and 5,000 receiving yards during his career.

In total he ran for 12,243 yards and caught 587 passes for 5,411 yards during a 15-year career in the National Football League from 1982 to 1997, playing for Los Angeles Raiders and the Kansas City Chiefs. He scored 145 touchdowns, including a then record 123 rushing touchdowns. He was inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame in 2003.

Allen was a spectacularly successful running back for the University of Southern California from 1987 to 1981. When he was drafted to play for Los Angeles Raiders in the NFL, his No 33 jersey was permanently retired by USC.

Allen is probably best remembered for his heroics in the 1984 Super Bowl against Washington Redskins when he ran for 191 yards, caught two passes for 18 yards, and scored two touchdowns in the Raiders 38-9 victory. This included a 74-yard touchdown run, at the time the longest run in Super Bowl history. His superlative display in the match won him the Most Valuable Player accolade.

In a nine year career with the Raiders, there were many other highlights. In 1985 he rushed for 1,759 yards and scored 11 touchdowns on 380 carries as he led the Raiders to a 12-4 record and the AFC West title and was named the NFL’s Most Valuable Player of the year.

He left Los Angeles Raiders for Kansas City Chiefs in 1993, teaming up with former San Francisco 49ers quarter-back great Joe Montana, where he scored 12 touchdowns as the Chiefs reached the AFC Championship Game. Although the Chiefs lost to Buffalo, Allen was named NFL Comeback Player of the Year. Allen retired from the game after the 1997 season.

Marcus Allen was elected a member of the Laureus World Sports Academy in January 2007.

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